Who, age What Where When Last Known Address
Shane Edwin Donoho, 37 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Rory Edwin Donoho, 59 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Gerald Stanton Donoho, 64 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Laura A. Donoho, 36 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Sandra L. Shaffer, 59 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Danny M. Hawkins, 60 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Miguel A. Kennedy, 26 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Mary S. Normand, 61 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Shawn Stone, 48 poaching

Springfield, OR

Lane County

January 6, 2011  
Type of Crime Other Crimes #/Type of animal(s) involved Case Status Next Court Date /Courthouse
Felony racketeering, identity theft

deer, elk, antelope & bear

Alleged

Lane County Circuit Court

Oregon State Police are investigating a Springfield father and son for alleged hunting practices that combine one of Oregon’s oldest crimes — poaching — with one of its newest: identity theft.

Rory Donoho, 59, and Shane Donoho, 37, have not been charged in connection with the probe into alleged illegal hunting of deer, elk, antelope and bear. But recent sworn statements by a state game officer to obtain search warrants in the case list possible charges of aggravated theft, racketeering, conspiracy, hunting for another person, unlawful possession of big game parts and sharing in the proceeds of a wildlife offense.

The affidavits by state police game officer Marc Boyd allege that the Donoho's' may have applied for or hunted with tags issued to eight other people — including one person who never gave them permission to use her identity.

The Donoho's' are co-owners of a Springfield-based janitorial firm, Rory’s Building Maintenance, according to court records.

A search warrant authorized Jan. 6 by Lane County Circuit Judge Debra Vogt led officers to seize 106 sets of deer and elk antlers during a Jan. 8 search of Rory and Shane Donoho’s homes. The search also yielded approximately 1,200 pounds of processed and frozen game meat; seven spotlights; and hunting tags and licenses for three people other than the two men, according to an inventory of seized items filed Jan. 10 with the returned search warrant.

During the search, police also found two freshly slain elk, Boyd wrote in a Jan. 14 affidavit for a second search warrant. Boyd alleged that Shane Donoho and another male relative had “unlawfully killed” the two animals that morning, using cow elk tags issued to two female relatives.

The second warrant, signed by Lane County Circuit Judge Maurice Merten, authorized the search of a Eugene meat company used by the Donoho's' to process and store game. It was returned and filed Jan. 19 along with another inventory of seized items that included 95 packages of deer meat and receipts for previous game processing orders dating back to 2005. Nothing in the search warrant suggested that the packing house was involved in the alleged illegal activities.

The state Fish and Wildlife Department’s Springfield office received numerous citizen complaints over eight years about alleged illegal hunting by the Donoho's', Boyd’s affidavit said. Most recently, complaints accused the pair of taking multiple black-tailed deer — primarily at night — in the Gate Creek and Hagen Mountain areas near Vida, Boyd wrote.

But officers never caught the father and son doing anything illegal, he wrote — even when he and retired state police Sgt. Tom Hulett set out a buck deer decoy in a salt lick the Donoho's' allegedly created off Hagen Mountain Road.

But things changed in November, when a woman who once dated a Rory’s Building Maintenance employee contacted the Springfield wildlife office, saying she was puzzled by a letter she received from the agency. The letter contained a “tooth envelope,” which state wildlife officials send to hunters who have reported harvesting large game animals. Such hunters are asked to send in a tooth from the animal so researchers can determine its age.

The woman told an agency employee that she “doesn’t hunt and has never hunted,” Boyd wrote. A review of agency records showed that someone using the woman’s name and address had purchased a 2010 hunting license and two different types of 2010 deer tags.

Further investigation showed that those tags were among licenses and tags purchased for three other people — including Shane Donoho, one of his relatives and one of his employees — within a nine-minute period at the same local Bi-Mart store, Boyd wrote.

The woman denied providing anyone her personal identifying information to use for that purpose. Identity theft is a Class C felony in Oregon, punishable by up to 13 months in prison for a first offense.

Further research by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife showed that someone using Shane Donoho’s phone number during a 90-minute period in November 2009 reported that tags issued to eight separate people were used to harvest a total of 12 deer.

One of those purported hunters was a 59-year-old female neighbor of Shane Donoho who had never before hunted big game in Oregon, Boyd wrote. Another was a Rory’s Building Maintenance employee whose report to the state indicated that he had killed a 2-point buck with a rifle, even though he is a convicted felon barred from possessing guns.

Game offenses such as possessing more than one tag or hunting for another person are Class A misdemeanors with a maximum penalty of a $6,250 fine and one year in jail. More substantial penalties could be imposed on someone convicted of racketeering or conspiracy in connection with such offenses.

Update 5/25/11:  Five members of a Springfield family and four others from Springfield were arraigned in what may be the biggest ever Oregon State Police poaching case.

All entered not guilty pleas after being arraigned in Lane County Circuit Court on a 103-count poaching and racketeering indictment handed down by a Lane County grand jury April 18.

Racketeering is a pattern of criminal behavior in which participants collaborate to use the same methods to commit multiple crimes. It is a felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison and a $375,000 fine.

The indictment accuses the nine of illegally transferring hunting licenses and tags to bag game using the names of people who do not hunt — including some whose personal identification was stolen and used to obtain fraudulent licenses and tags.

An investigation led by Springfield-based Trooper Marc Boyd allegedly revealed a five-year criminal conspiracy to illegally harvest nearly 300 deer on public and private land in the state’s McKenzie wildlife management unit. Elk, antelope and bear were also illegally killed in the scheme, according to a state police statement released Thursday.

Sgt. Ron Martin, who commands the agency’s Springfield area Fish and Wildlife Division, said the probe was the largest single poaching case ever investigated by state police.

Shane Edwin Donoho, 37, faces the most serious counts. He was indicted on six felonies — one count of racketeering and five counts of identity theft, also a felony and punishable by up to five years in prison and a $125,000 fine. He also was charged with 73 misdemeanors. They include one count each of second-degree forgery, unlawful hunting of a cow elk and unlawful possession of a game mammal; six counts of computer crime; five counts of unlawful taking of big game; and 50 counts of unlawful possession of big game parts. Wildlife offenses are class A misdemeanors punishable by up to a year in jail and up to $6,250 in fines.

His father, Rory Edwin Donoho, 59, faces one count each of racketeering, unlawful taking of antlerless deer and unlawful loaning of big game tag; two counts of identity theft; three counts of unlawful borrowing of big game tag; and 50 counts of unlawful possession of big game parts.

Also charged in the indictment:

Gerald Stanton Donoho, 64, Rory Donoho’s brother and Shane Donoho’s uncle. He faces one count each of racketeering, unlawful hunting of a cow elk and unlawful possession of bear meat.

Laura A. Donoho, 36, Shane Donoho’s wife. She faces one count each of racketeering, unlawful loan or transfer of hunting tag, attempted unlawful loan of hunting tag and unlawful take of antlerless deer.

Sandra L. Shaffer, 59, Shane’s Donoho’s mother and Rory Donoho’s ex-wife. She faces one count each of racketeering, unlawful possession of antlerless deer, and attempted unlawful loan or transfer of hunting tag.

Danny M. Hawkins, 60 — one count of racketeering, and three counts of unlawful loan or transfer of hunting tags.

Miguel A. Kennedy, 26 — one count each of racketeering and unlawful loan or transfer of hunting tags, two counts of second-degree forgery and four counts of identity theft.

Mary S. Normand, 61 — one count of racketeering, and two counts of unlawful loan or transfer of hunting tag.

Shawn Stone, 48 — one count each of racketeering and unlawful taking of cow elk and two counts of unlawful borrowing of big game tag.

Attempted wildlife offenses are class B misdemeanors punishable by up to six months in jail and fines of up to $2,500.

The nine were arrested after a 15-month investigation by Fish and Wildlife Division troopers from the state police offices in Springfield, Albany, Bend, Oakridge, Florence and Roseburg.

Reference:

The Register-Guard