Who, age What Where When Last Known Address
Johnny Franklin Maynard, 42 ~100 dogs seized from U-Haul truck

Little Rock, AR

Pulaski County

September 14, 2007 Arkadelphia, AR
Sharon Ann Maynard, 54 ~100 dogs seized from U-Haul truck

Little Rock, AR

Pulaski County

September 14, 2007 Arkadelphia, AR
Type of Crime Other Crimes #/Type of animal(s) involved Case Status Next Court Date /Courthouse
Misdemeanor fugitives from justice 70 dogs, 4 cats & 11 birds Dismissed

Little Rock District Court

An Arkadelphia, Arkansas couple is accused of animal cruelty after more than 70 dogs, 4 cats and 11 birds were found abandoned in a U-Haul Truck at at 4809 W. 65th St. in Little Rock.

Johnny Franklin Maynard, 42, and Sharon Ann Maynard, 54, are to appeal in court Monday September 17, on 172 animal cruelty charges.

The charges include neglect and failure to provide medical aid.

Volunteers and Little Rock Animal Shelter staffers worked overnight evaluating the conditions of the animals.

  Photo courtesy of North West Arkansas News

Purebred Chihuahuas, Pekingese, poodles and terriers were among the menagerie, along with cats and birds.

The owners say they could no longer care for the animals and were taking them to family members in Missouri when the truck broke down.

Update 9/16/07:
After Little Rock Animal Services employees discovered the animals in the back of a U-Haul truck Friday night, volunteers with the agency and the Humane Society of Pulaski County worked from 5 p.m. Friday until about 2 a.m. Saturday evaluating the conditions of “70-something dogs, 11 birds and 4 cats” outside the U-Haul store at 4809 W. 65th St., said Tracy Roark, animal services manager.

The animals had been in the truck, which had broken down, for at least two days. Most of them were purebred, small dogs such as Chihuahuas, Pekingese, poodles and terriers.

“They were in pretty bad shape,” Roark said. “We’ve not seen anything in the city like this.”

Update 9/17/07:
Johnny Franklin Maynard, 42, and Sharon Ann Maynard, 54, both of 2460 Hasley Road in Arkadelphia, were to appear in Little Rock District Court today.

A Little Rock city ordinance allows for a fine of up to $ 500 for each violation, Roark said.

The Maynards were each charged with 92 counts of neglect and 80 counts of failure to provide medical aid.  “Cruelty includes physical abuse and abuse by neglect, which is failure to provide adequate shelter, food, water and medical care.”

Six volunteers helped rescue the animals, which were in wire cages lined up in rows and stacked inside the unventilated truck, said Kay Jordan, executive director of the county Humane Society.

“The birds... there were a few in birdcages sitting around outside on the ground, and then there were some birds in little pet taxis” in a vehicle being towed by the U-Haul truck, Jordan said. “All the rest of ’em were piled up — it was either four or five layers... on each side of the inside of the truck. Then there were pet taxis that we figured... had some cats and dogs in them that they had set in the middle between the tiers of cages.”

Some of the cages had to be cut open to get the animals out, and the stench of the truck was “toxic,” Jordan said.  “There was urine and feces coming out of the back of the truck,” she said.

Desiree Bender, state director of the Humane Society of the United States, said she suspected the animals came from a puppy mill and were being sold to pet stores.  “Arkansas is one of the top nine puppy-mill states in the United States,” Bender said.  Bender said she feared the animals had been kept in the cages for a while.

“Inside this U-Haul truck was the equivalent of a garage that had dogs in it for months and years,” she said. “These dogs, we had to yank them, pull them totally out of those crates. We had a hard time getting a lot of them out because they wouldn’t come out.”

"They were pretty matted up, pretty covered in feces and had urine burns on their stomach,” Tracy Roark with Little Rock Animal Services said.

As of Saturday night, all the animals were being cared for by the city and the Humane Society.

Animal-welfare advocates in Arkansas have been working to establish stiffer penalties for cruelty to animals.  Two bills that would have made animal cruelty a felony on either the first or second offense failed in the Legislature earlier this year.  The crime is currently a misdemeanor.

Police are searching for the Maynard's.  There's a warrant out for the Maynards’ arrest since they missed their court appearance. That’s not a big surprise after what animal control says the Maynards told them. They said they would continue their drive, leaving Arkansas.

If they did, a warrant in connection with these misdemeanor crimes means they won't be caught and won't be brought back. However, Roark says the city is looking into issuing a fugitive warrant, which would cross state lines.

Update 9/19/07:
Police are still searching for the Maynard's, an Arkadelphia couple who failed to show for a court appearance in Little Rock on dozens of charges of animal neglect.

At last word, investigators were attempting to secure a fugitive warrant for the Maynard's.

Update 9/20/07:
According to Tracy Roark, animal services manager at the Humane Society of Pulaski County, the animals had been in the truck, which had broken down, for at least 2 days.

A Little Rock city ordinance allows for a fine of up to $500 for each violation, Roark said.
The Maynard's were each charged with 92 counts of neglect and 80 counts of failure to provide medical aid.

The Maynard's, reside at 2460 Hasley Road in Arkadelphia in Clark County.

Six volunteers helped rescue the animals, which were in wire cages lined up in rows and stacked inside the unventilated truck, said Kay Jordan, executive director of the Humane Society.

“The birds … there were a few in birdcages sitting around outside on the ground, and then there were some birds in little pet taxis” in a vehicle being towed by the U-Haul truck, Jordan said. “All the rest of them were piled up in either 4 or 5 layers … on each side of the inside of the truck. Then there were pet taxis with some cats and dogs in them that were set in the middle between the tiers of cages.”

Some of the cages had to be cut open to get the animals out, and the stench of the truck was “toxic,” Jordan said.“There was urine and feces coming out of the back of the truck,” she said.

Desiree Bender, state director of the Humane Society of the United States, said she suspected the animals came from a puppymill and were being sold to pet stores.
“Arkansas is one of the top 9 puppymill states in the United States,” Bender said. Bender said she feared the animals had been kept in the cages for a while.  “Inside this U-Haul truck was the equivalent of a garage that had dogs in it for months and years,” she said. “These dogs, we had to yank them, pull them totally out of those crates. We had a hard time getting a lot of them out because they wouldn’t come out.”

All the animals were being cared for by the city and the Humane Society.

Animal-welfare advocates in Arkansas have been working to establish stiffer penalties for cruelty to animals. Two bills that would have made animal cruelty a felony on either the first or second offense failed in the Legislature earlier this year. Currently, the crime is a misdemeanor.

The Maynards filed a lawsuit against UHaul, The Humane Society of the United States, the Humane Society of Pulaski County and the City of Little Rock upon which each lawsuit was dismissed.

Plaintiff: Johnny Maynard and Sharon Maynard
Defendant: Little Rock, City of, Little Rock Animal Services, Tracy Roark, David Johnson, Pulaski County Humane Society, Kay Jordan, United States Humane Society, Desiree Bender and U-Haul Company of Arkansas

Case Number: 4:2010cv01232
Filed: September 13, 2010

Court: Arkansas Eastern District Court
Office: Little Rock Office
County: Clark
Presiding Judge: Brian S. Miller

Nature of Suit: Other Civil Rights
Cause of Action: 42:1983
Jury Demanded By: Plaintiff

Date Filed # Document Text
December 9, 2010
ORDER dismissing plaintiffs' claims against deft U-Haul Company of Arkansas with prejudice. Signed by Judge Brian S. Miller on 12/9/10
read the court record

March 22, 2011
ORDER dismissing plaintiffs' complaint against the Humane Society of the United States and Desiree Bender with prejudice. Signed by Judge Brian S. Miller on 3/22/11

read the court record

May 24, 2011
PROTECTIVE ORDER. Signed by Judge Brian S. Miller on 5/24/11
ORDER granting Plaintiffs' unopposed motion to voluntarily dismiss and dismissing the case without prejudice. Signed by Judge Brian S. Miller on 8/17/2011

read the court record

Reference:

My Eyewitness News WRCB-TV
Ozarks First Arkansas Democrat-Gasette
arkansas online nwanews
todaysthv KTHV